Scham und Schuld
Symposium für trauma- und körperorientierte Psychotherapie
14./15. Juni 2019 in Leipzig
Psychotraumatologie, Psychoanalyse, Körperpsychotherapie, Hirnforschung, Affektforschung, Bindungsforschung, moderne systemische Psychotherapie für Erwachsene sowie für Kinder und Jugendliche
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Veranstalter:

Trauma-Institut-Leipzig
Trauma-Institut-Leipzig an der Akademie für Ganzheitliche Psychotherapie

Fortbildungszyklen für Traumafachberater und Psychotraumatherapeuten

Akademie für Ganzheitliche Psychotherapie
Akademie für Ganzheitliche Psychotherapie
(gemeinnützige Organisation)
Fortbildung in trauma- und körperorientierter schulenübergreifender Psychotherapie

Program

deutsch      english

Friday, June 14 and Saturday, June 15, 2019

With a broad pallet of speakers we hope that we can produce a fruitful learning and discussion atmosphere. As organisers we hope that this diversity will arouse both your curiosity as a participant and your interest as a colleague with the integration of new trends in psychotraumatology.

Time

Friday, June 14, 2019 – 1st Day

12:00
am

Opening of the conference office

1:00
pm

Opening with DP Irina Vogt

1:05
pm

Prof. Martin DorahyProf. Martin Dorahy is a clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and Co-edited three books in the area of psychotraumatology. He is a Fellow, Board member and current President of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD). He maintains a clinical practice on the adult sequelae of childhood relational trauma. .

Shame, dissociation and enactment in complex trauma disorders: An overview.
This presentation provides an overview of the centrality of shame in complex trauma disorders, and its association with both re-enactments and dissociation. This overview will be expanded on in a longer presentation the following day. Early relational trauma impacts on every aspect of development, including the way the individual comes to view who they are, which encompasses the nature of their autobiographical memory. The development of self that is organised around shame and shaming memories, leaves the individual vulnerable to further attack from other people as they view their self as not worthy of care and protection. As a result shame erodes their capacity to act assertively and take actions that might foster self-care. This presentation will look at the psychology of shame in those with complex trauma disorders, and how it is relevant to the different grades of dissociative pathology in Vogt’s SPIM model.

1:30
pm

Short break

1:35
pm

Dr.rer.nat., Dipl.-Psychologe Ralf VogtDr.rer.nat., Dipl.-Psychologe Ralf Vogt
has also been a psychotherapist for more than 30 years and, like his wife, has been active for about 20 years in the field of severe psychotrauma disorders. He has published more than 10 specialist books on the SPIM therapy model, which is now available in the revised SPIM-30 version, and has written some of them monographically. Dr. Vogt has again initiated an interesting study of the Trauma-Institute-Leipzig on the topic of the congress and will present theoretical and practical connections to psychotraumatically shaped shame and guilt with his accompanying and current findings. In addition, he will also explain some interesting case examples on this topic with the SPIM-30 treatment variants used in order to provide colleagues with suggestions.

 

Introductory Lecture: Shame and Guilt and Therapeutic Access Using the SPIM 30 Treatment Programme

This introductory lecture briefly outlines the clinical significance of shame and guilt in trauma patients in outpatient treatment. Apparent every time is the fundamental rootedness of these topics with early childhood trauma issues, when it deals with the cumulative violence of related people in a close environment, like the majority of our case examples do.
Methodologically, a number of settings of the SPIM 30 treatment model for dissociative / complex-traumatised individuals take into account these mental and emotional access problems in specific therapeutic interventions. For this purpose photo-documented case examples are given.

2:00
pm

Short break

2:05
pm

Dr. Joanne TwomblyDr. Joanne Twombly

has been a psychoanalyst for many years and is an EMDR trauma therapist in Boston, USA. Dr. Twombly is a long-standing internationally recognised member of ISSTD and has repeatedly developed components for modern psychoanalytic trauma psychotherapy. She is a well-founded practitioner and will use case examples from her decades of experience to point out important basic approaches in the treatment of shame and guilt and present her concept for discussion. Dr. Twombly is also the author of numerous case articles on analytical psychotraumatology.

 

If You Get to Know Me, You Will Hate Me

The many faces of shame will be described through this case presentation of a woman whose symptomatic behavior in treatment indicated a history of sadistic abuse. Participants will gain understanding of how patient/therapist enactments were used to identify her shame storms on all 4 directions of Nathanson’s Compass of Shame.

2.30
pm

Short break

2:35
pm

Dipl.-Ing., Logopäde Robert RichterRobert Richter
is a speech language pathologist and certified stutter therapist (ivs), he has been working intensively for many years in the field of stuttering therapy in Leipzig and together with Andreas Starke from VIERMALFÜNF - Intensive Interval Therapy for Stuttering, he has several years of teaching experience on the subject of fluency disorders, is a training consultant in psychotraumatology at Trauma-Institute Leipzig and is a board member of the Interdisciplinary Association of Stutter Therapists “Interdisziplinären Vereinigung der Stottertherapeuten“ (ivs)

 

Guilt and shame in the context of trauma-relevant high-stress experiences in severe stuttering

Own observations in stuttering therapy show that patients with severe stuttering symptoms show symptoms of high stress. Although the development of a stutter can currently hardly be regarded as a consequence of traumatisation, it has been observed that the serious and repeated loss of control caused by stuttering can lead to a cumulative trauma-relevant high-stress experience. The resulting development of negative emotions, such as guilt and shame, but also social phobias, avoidance behaviour and depression, in some cases considerably limit the quality of life of those affected. In the lecture, the current status of the theory of stuttering will be linked with findings from psychotraumatology. Therapeutic interventions will be outlined and references to aspects of the SPIM-30 treatment model will be established.

3:00
pm

Coffee break - Book and CD sale and information

3:30
pm

Prof. George RhoadesProf. George Rhoades
is an internationally renowned member and for many years a leading figure of the ISSTD. His specialty is intercultural comparisons as a psychotraumatologist of emergency aid in various humanitarian aid projects worldwide. Prof. Rhoades has earned great praise through his contributions to emergency care in projects in Africa, for example in Sudan and Rwanda, to name but a few trouble spots.
Prof. Rhoades knows the conceptual and cultural differences in understanding and dealing with shame and guilt. His knowledge of Catholicism and his own following of shamanic customs due to living in Hawaii and other minorities in Oceania are also advantageous. In his lectures Prof. George Rhoades will explain the conceptual and phenotypic differences between shame and guilt on different continents (Asia, Africa, Middle East and Oceania) and compare them to the industrial nations (Europe, America and Japan) and describe how he deals with these challenges.

 

Introductory Lecture: Shame, Guilt and Trauma: Intercultural Implications

In this introductory lecture, historical definitions of the different perspectives of various cultures on the concepts of shame and guilt are highlighted and contrasted in diverse accents.
It is amazing and also comprehensible how the everyday way of life and the specialties of the environment shape the thoughts and feelings of people in their social structures and thus create different value systems, which one must consider in therapy.


4:00
pm

Short break

4:05
pm

Diplomsängerin, Diplomgesangpädagogin Monika TruttMonika Trutt
With a degree in singing and vocal training she is also a TIL trauma practitioner of the SPIM-30 treatment method. Since 2003 she has been a freelance and employed singer, with engagements ranging from opera to aria evenings and appearances in folk and pop bands.

 

Let your own voice sound – perceive it and make it audible

Develop your voice and show yourself. This is often not possible, dangerous and shameful for trauma patients.
We all express ourselves through our voice. Not only what we say, but also how we say it using tone, volume and timbre. The singing voice has a greater range of expressive possibilities and is much more intense than the speaking voice. Strength, self-confidence and the most diverse emotions are shown through singing. The professional singer knows this and uses all the attributes of singing to amazing effect on stage. However, blockades from traumatisations are also expressed through the voice. Hoarseness, a quiet voice, a pressed voice, a fear of singing, a fear of being loud, and often a sense of shame to show themselves so open.
This lecture highlights the opportunities and possibilities of working with the voice for trauma patients in uncovering and discovering their own topics and traumatic experiences, but also to stabilise and strengthen their self-esteem. The Spim 30 treatment model, for example, on the basis of working with parts of the personality which recognises perpetrator introjects in particular includes the voice and can detect the causes of vocal blockages.

4:35
pm

Short break

4:40
pm

Mediengestalter Marco GüntherMarco Günther
Born in Jena in 1974, 1993 Abitur (high school leaving exam)(Jena), 1998 Completion of carpentry training (Thuringia), 2006 Completion of media designer training (BFW Leipzig), 2014 Bachelor of Science Psychology (Leipzig University), 2014 Trauma consultant examination (TIL Leipzig), since 2016 coordinator at MännerHaus Leipzig (LEMANN e.V.)

 

Being a victim for beginners

Equivalent to women’s shelters that have existed for decades, the Free State of Saxony has been funding men’s shelters only since 2016. These shelters are set up for men and their children who have become victims of violence in their immediate environment.
The coordinator of the Leipzig institution reports on the work with people who only seek protection and security when they visit such an institution as they do not find these elements in their social fabric. The work in a men’s-protection-apartment resembles that of reception-centres somewhat, in which at first a “safe place” is created. The distancing from the trauma structure is often the only commonly agreed denominator in cooperation and is consistently affected by the perpetrator’s connection and the value systems of the perpetrators which are acted out through perpetrator introjections. Dealing with the contradictoriness of one’s “own” identity, becoming a victim/perpetrator, weakness/manliness, helplessness/not being at the mercy of others, being dependent/self-reliant is most clearly expressed in the fluctuations in the perception of one’s own guilt and the suppression of shame. Shame plays a special role here, since there is still no recognised cognitive representation in the public perception in which men are granted a special need for protection.
Working with people in such social work situations requires a great deal of sensitivity and knowledge of the perpetrator-victim-dialectic dynamics and the well-placed minimum use of methods and techniques that can serve as orientation for those affected

5:10
pm

Discussion and final statements

 

Time

Saturday, June 15, 2019, 2nd Day

8:00
am

Opening of the conference office

9:00
am

Prof. Martin DorahyProf. Martin Dorahy is a clinical psychologist and professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters, and Co-edited three books in the area of psychotraumatology. He is a Fellow, Board member and current President of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISSTD). He maintains a clinical practice on the adult sequelae of childhood relational trauma. 

 

Part 2: Shame, dissociation and enactment in complex trauma disorders: Dynamics, cases and treatment considerations.
This presentation will expand on the overview and explore how shame develops as a retreat away from other people and an attempt to isolate the self, which often manifests in self-attack. Shame can also lead to people attacking others and re-enacting their traumatic experiences as a way of trying to distance from the helplessness, dejection and powerlessness of the affect. Dissociation may also be a mechanism employed to distance from the potency of feeling shame, yet experiencing dissociation can also create feelings of shame as the individual feels unable to control or be aware of their actions, memories and feelings. This seems to be particularly evident in the therapeutic relationship. This presentation explores these dynamics in those with a history of complex, early relational trauma. Case studies are used examine how both shame and dissociation erode the interpersonal field so the patient is left accounting for what happened to them based on their own actions, rather than the actions of another. Attention will be given to the therapeutic interaction, including how shame impacts on the disclosure of autobiographical memories and changes during the course of therapy.

.

10:00
am

Short break

10:05
am

Dr.rer.nat., Dipl.-Psychologe Ralf VogtDr.rer.nat., Dipl.-Psychologe Ralf Vogt
has also been a psychotherapist for more than 30 years and, like his wife, has been active for about 20 years in the field of severe psychotrauma disorders. He has published more than 10 specialist books on the SPIM therapy model, which is now available in the revised SPIM-30 version, and has written some of them monographically. Dr. Vogt has again initiated an interesting study of the Trauma-Institute-Leipzig on the topic of the congress and will present theoretical and practical connections to psychotraumatically shaped shame and guilt with his accompanying and current findings. In addition, he will also explain some interesting case examples on this topic with the SPIM-30 treatment variants used in order to provide colleagues with suggestions.

 

Part 2: Self-Attribution of Shame and Guilt and Chances of Coping with it in Trauma Therapy
Based on the introductory lecture from Friday, the importance and treatment of shame and guilt is outlined here with the help of SPIM 30 settings with psycho trauma patients. The main lecture core is the own research carried out on shame and guilt through a client survey involving beginning and advanced patients of different diagnostic groups. This shows similarities in the subjective assessment of traumatic incidents involving violence by close people in all diagnostic groups. Depending on the different diagnosis groups there are, however, interesting differences in the therapy stages with regard to more in-depth insight into shame and guilt. In addition, evidently different levels of severity and the specifics of psycho-traumatic early experiences lead to depressive-self-destructive withdrawals as well as to a paranoid avoidance of social relationships or to aggressive defensive attacks. For this purpose, the first research results of the pilot study should be linked with intervention possibilities.

11:05
am

Coffee break - Book and CD sale and information

11:30
am

Dr. Joanne TwomblyDr. Joanne Twombly
has been a psychoanalyst for many years and is an EMDR trauma therapist in Boston, USA. Dr. Twombly is a long-standing internationally recognised member of ISSTD and has repeatedly developed components for modern psychoanalytic trauma psychotherapy. She is a well-founded practitioner and will use case examples from her decades of experience to point out important basic approaches in the treatment of shame and guilt and present her concept for discussion. Dr. Twombly is also the author of numerous case articles on analytical psychotraumatology.

 

The Creation and Maintenance of Shame and its Treatment
in Adult Sex Abuse Survivors

Child sex offenders go to great lengths to ensure that they don’t get caught, ensure they can continue abusing a child or children, and to ensure the long-term suffering of their victims. Shame is key in this process. It is vital to the victim’s healing, that psychotherapists understand how offenders use the child’s normal shame responses, and work to add additional layers of shame to assist with accomplishing these goals. This presentation will discuss the belief systems of offenders, and the impact of their manipulations and abuses on victims’ process of survival, self-esteem and belief systems; and discuss implications for treatment.

12:30
am

Lunchtime-snacks on-site – Book and CD sale and information

1:30
pm

Franziska Schlensorg-SchusterDr. med. Franziska Schlensog-Schuster
Specialist in paediatrics and adolescent medicine, specialist in paediatric and adolescent psychiatry and psychotherapy, senior physician at the Interdisciplinary Psychosomatics / Parent-Child Unit of the University Hospital Leipzig, Analytical Group Therapist (D3G). She leads the area of early interaction disorders. Her therapeutic approach combines the fields of paediatrics, psychosomatics, psychiatry, psychotherapy and aspects of traumatisation primarily through medical interventions.

 

Guilt or innocence in the treatment of abused children and their parents

In research projects of the University Child Psychiatry Leipzig 36% of the examined children show different forms of maltreatment experiences. The effects of these mistreatments on the emotional, psychological and psychiatric outcome are serious. More than half of these children show externalising and internalising disturbances. Especially boys with severe, chronic and very early maltreatment types are more likely to develop externalising diagnoses. In psychotherapeutic processes, a real safe place must initially be found that can hold, endure and contain these serious traumatizations in order to work therapeutically effectively. In the exhausted system of inpatient measures of the youth welfare service of the city of Leipzig, hardly a place like this can still be found. The lecture, embedded in current research, will give an insight into this dilemma and outline possible solutions and their limitations.

2:30
pm

Coffee break - Book and CD sale and information

2:50
pm

Prof. George RhoadesProf. George Rhoades
is an internationally renowned member and for many years a leading figure of the ISSTD. His specialty is intercultural comparisons as a psychotraumatologist of emergency aid in various humanitarian aid projects worldwide. Prof. Rhoades has earned great praise through his contributions to emergency care in projects in Africa, for example in Sudan and Rwanda, to name but a few trouble spots.
Prof. Rhoades knows the conceptual and cultural differences in understanding and dealing with shame and guilt. His knowledge of Catholicism and his own following of shamanic customs due to living in Hawaii and other minorities in Oceania are also advantageous. In his lectures Prof. George Rhoades will explain the conceptual and phenotypic differences between shame and guilt on different continents (Asia, Africa, Middle East and Oceania) and compare them to the industrial nations (Europe, America and Japan) and describe how he deals with these challenges.

 

Part 2: Shame, Guilt and Trauma: Intercultural Implications
Based on the introductory lecture, important differences in the intercultural perspectives of shame and guilt are explained to the audience. Reporting is based on 30 years of experience of caring for trauma patients in conflict areas around the world. This experience and knowledge can be used to refer to cultural differences in the concepts, contexts and metaphors of shame and guilt, which can broaden our western horizons and also deepen our understanding of psychotrauma in an interesting way.
Case examples from the meeting with aid workers as well as numerous patients in Africa and Asia illustrate for the audience – in addition to photographic evidence – these facts and psychosocial framework contexts and stimulate discussion with the audience afterwards. As a result, therapeutic implications arise almost automatically when we understand other systems of values and beliefs, which also influence trauma contexts.

3:50
pm

Short break

3:55
pm

Diplompsychologin Irina VogtDiplompsychologin Irina Vogt
Phas been a psychotherapist for over 30 years and has been working in the field of highly dissociative trauma disorders for over 20 years. Together with her husband, she founded the Trauma-Institute-Leipzig and mediates the SPIM-30 treatment programme she created with her husband for colleagues interested in trauma therapy. Her orientation lies in creative play therapy for children as well as in the treatment of torture-programmed clients.

 

Existential Shame after Existential Early Destruction

The subject of shame is introduced to the conference attendees at the beginning of the lecture through theoretical analytic preliminary considerations. It turns out that old; sometimes little discussed traditional concepts offer very good material for today’s discussions.
A case report forms the focal point for further representations where theory and practice for existential shame is explained in context and with detail. A trauma case example arising from early childhood of a psychologically severely damaged and violently physically and sexually abused man leads us through the lecture. For listeners, it is often unbelievable and hard to imagine how such cruel things can happen within the confines of a closed family that, to the outside world events remain inconspicuous.
This quasi-maddening parallelism of cruelty and banality is named as an important factor in the chronification of existential shame with a high level of self-deprecation.

4:55
pm

Short break

5:00
pm

Discussion and final statements

5:30
pm

End of main conference